Fridays

Like Clockwork: Full Metal Kubrick

Programmed by Daniel Frankel
Essay by Daniel Frankel

 

2015-04-03 @ 7:00 PM 9:30 PM
Saturday 1:00 PM
Sunday 1:30 PM

A Clockwork Orange

(Stanley Kubrick, 1971) · Alex and his droogs need some milk-plus to prepare for a bit of the old ultra-violence (and you may need some too). As a satire of behvaiorla psychology and totalitarian governments, A Clockwork Orange still manages to shock the most savagely intellectual. The wicked Alex, outfitted jockstrap, bowler hat, and his signature eyeliner indulges in rape and Beethoven, but still lures the audience into his deviancy and dubious redemption from delinquency.

runtime: 136 min format: 35mm

 

2015-04-10 @ 6:00 PM 9:30 PM
Saturday 1:00 PM
Sunday 1:30 PM

Spartacus

(Stanley Kubrick, 1960) · Two weeks into production, Kubrick stepped in for Anthony Mann to helm this epic story of the Roman slave revolt. While Kubrick was thought of as a gun for hire, not only did he execute a blockbuster with finesse, but he also brought his own meticulous detail and visual sensibility. Kubrick disowned the film, but it remains a classic allegory for Hollywood's blacklist and an infusion of Kubrickian controversy to a swords and sandals picture.

runtime: 197 min format: 35mm

 

2015-04-17 @ 7:00 PM 10:00 PM
Sunday 1:30 PM

Lolita

(Stanley Kubrick, 1962) · English professor Humbert Humbert takes a room in the house of Charlotte Haze, the noxious mama of the eponymous nymphet. Humbert's prurient obsession with the pop-drinking, gum-popping Lolita quickly escalates. Kubrick accentuates the black humor of the novel, in turn deemphasizing Nabakovís lyrical eroticism. Lolita marked a stylistic transition for Kubrick from the epic naturalism of his earlier films to the surrealism of Dr. Strangelove and beyond.

runtime: 152 min format: 35mm

 

2015-04-24 @ 7:00 PM 9:00 PM
Saturday 1:00 PM
Sunday 1:30 PM

Dr. Strangelove

(Stanley Kubrick, 1964) · Kubrickís brilliant satire of Cold War politics was built on the doomsday fears of the 1960s, but it remains trenchant and hilarious upon reviewings. You canít see the Big Board and you canít fight in the War Room, but a military general could still incite nuclear armageddon without consulting the President. Condemned as Soviet propaganda upon its release, audiences couldn't help themselves and learned not to worry and grew to love Dr. Strangelove.

runtime: 95 min format: 35mm

 

2015-05-01 @ 7:00 PM 9:30 PM
Sunday 1:30 PM

2001: A Space Odyssey

(Stanley Kubrick, 1968) · With only 40 minutes of dialogue, Kubrick's space odyssey often leaves the audience in the dark. Whether that is literally in the first few minutes of pure black screen with no music or by withholding any neat resolution or answers by the filmís end, Kubrick demands an emotional comprehension and concentration.This film is a singularly transcendent spectacle that still manages to be awe-inspiring and exhilarating even after the year 2001.

runtime: 141 min format: 35mm

 

2015-05-08 @ 7:00 PM 9:15 PM
Saturday 1:00 PM
Sunday 1:30 PM

Full Metal Jacket

(Stanley Kubrick, 1987) · Born out of a desire to make a Holocaust film, Kubrick settled upon Vietnam to revisit the glory days of Paths of Glory. Kubrick's poetic episodes of new recruit training serve as a harrowing meditation on dehumanization in this tale. Former U.S. Marine Drill Instructor Ermey was originally hired as a technical advisor, but landed the role of Hartman, largely improvising his vicious insults and demeaning breakdown of each new recruit.

runtime: 116 min format: 35mm

 

2015-05-15 @ 6:00 PM 9:30 PM
Saturday 1:00 PM
Sunday 1:30 PM

Barry Lyndon

(Stanley Kubrick, 1975) · Barry, the Irish bloke, pursues love, sophistication, and wealth, but instead finds himself bored and bitter within a beautiful tableaux of the British aristocracy. To assemble this 18th century costume piece, Kubrick combined previous research on aborted attempts at filming Thackeray's Vanity Fair and a biopic of Napoleon Bonaparte. Special ultra-fast lenses allowed Kubrick to craft some of his most stunning scenes, illuminated solely by natural light.

runtime: 184 min format: 35mm

 

2015-05-22 @ 7:00 PM 9:45 PM
Saturday 1:00 PM
Sunday 1:30 PM

The Shining

(Stanley Kubrick, 1980) · Heeeere's Johnny! Check in at Room 237 of the Overlook Hotel--you may see some gruesome ghouls and disturbing demons. Despite its shocks, The Shining never relies on cheap thrills. Instead, Kubrick enhances the paranoia of entrapment through harrowing use of Steadicam and an unsettlingly dissonant soundtrack. Initially met with negative feedback, Kubrick racked up his first (and only) Razzie award nomination for his coldly composed direction.

runtime: 109 min format: 35mm

 

2015-05-29 @ 7:00 PM 10:00 PM
Sunday 1:30 PM

Eyes Wide Shut

(Stanley Kubrick, 1999) · Holding the Guinness World Record for the longest continuous shoot at 400 days, Eyes Wide Shut was the most fitting end of Kubrick's career. Receiving top-billing along with the then-married Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise, Kubrick compressed elements of all of his previous genre films to form an orgy of film style. To call it an erotic thriller would be reductive--in truth, it's a sonata, a fugue, a waltz all at once, and a film worth experiencing.

runtime: 159 min format: 35mm

 

2015-06-05 @ 7:00 PM 9:30 PM
Saturday 1:00 PM
Sunday 1:30 PM

Fear and Desire

(Stanley Kubrick, 1953) · Dissatisfied with his first feature film, Kubrick tried to purchase every print of Fear and Desire to remove it from circulation. However, this Library of Congress restoration allows audiences to see Kubrick's least-seen major work: an existentialist art house film masquerading as an antiwar picture. Kubrick's earliest works, three newsreel documentaries from the Collection of the Library of Congress, will follow the movie. Print courtesy of the Library of Congress.

runtime: 62 min format: 35mm

 

back to the calendar

Facebook Twitter Instagram